Orchid Propagation by Division

The orchids have been very prolific in flower production during the growing season this year. I believe that this was the result of a dedicated automated watering system, consistent generous fertilization, control of direct sunlight and pest control. In addition to the production of flowers, the leaves, air roots and stems have multiplied. This has put some of the plants outside of their designated boxes. The air roots have attached to their boxes, trellis and the wall of the house. The stems have extended themselves into the walking space and often times the blossoms overgrow one another obstructing the view. To bring some order into the orchid garden I tried something new. There are many choices to propagate plants including germination of seeds, plant division and budding/grafting. In this instance I have started two new plants by division. Below is a photo record of the process I followed.

Example one shows a phalaenopsis orchid with devision at a level well above the base of the plant. In this area, at a node, the plant has sprouted a group of air roots and three new leaves. These are substantially separated from the root and leaf ball of the main portion of the plant. Using a razor I sectioned the stem from the base of the plant and trimmed away all remaining portions of the stem system leaving just the roots and leaves.

Ex.1a The secondary root and leaf section started at an area just distal to a node on the stem. a portion of the original stem was lost and this is the secondary growth result.
Ex.1b It is easy to see the conflicted growth of this area. The excess stem growth was cut back to form a more organized growth start point.
Ex.1c Exposed stem above the root ball and below the new air roots.
Ex.1d Sectioned stem just distal to a growth node.
Ex.1e Here is the trimmed plant section
Ex.1f The plant section is fastened into box and stem covered with rubber mulch.

Example two demonstrates a cattleya orchid. The growth has a clearly defined section with air roots and three leafs at the base of the plant. This area of the Cattleya is relatively new and had a well defined stem. Using a razor blade I sectioned through the stem and removed the segment.

Ex.2a Plant in crowded pot. It needs to be replanted into a box. Blue arrow points to cut point.
Ex.2b Before repotting the entire plant I elected to thin the growth. Blue arrow points to cut point.
Ex.2c Sectioned through the root stem with a sharp blade.
Ex. 2d The cutting is placed into a box with the air roots protruding through the wooden slats. It is held in place with ties to facilitate anchorage
Ex.2e Anchored and air roots protruding
Ex 2f Plant section fastened into box with mulch.

Both new plant segments were placed into appropriately sized boxes with some of the air roots protruding through the wooden slats and gently fastened to the sides of the box for stability. The base of the box was lined with Sphagnum moss and the remainder filled with shredded rubber mulch for stability and appearance. I have found that the rubber mulch retains some moisture but does not decay. This also reduces the possibility of mould and insect growth.

The new specimens were replaced into the orchid garden and will be treated in the usual routine. In time we can check the viability and growth of these new cuttings. If successful, they may provide new blossoms for the next growing season. I feel that the new plants are a return on investment for the good care provided to the orchids.

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#orchid #division #propagation #cattleya #phalaenopsis #

Mushrooms Are Not Plants

Mushrooms are not plants or animals . They have a classification all their own. They are fungi. This is a sample of a local SWFL mushroom that should start a discussion on fungi. The purpose is to provide a vocabulary for description and to show the various forms of these fungi. The growth that is seen above ground typified by this example is the fruit of the fungi. From this fruit spores are shed to facilitate reproduction. Below the ground is the bulk or the working organism. This undergrowth is very extensive in both size and spread. The undergrowth also provides a network of communication for further reproduction and communication with plants that share the same environment. Showed here are both the macroscopic and the microscopic structures.

From this you will also see that fungi are not plants but are a completely different life form. When entering data in the Epicollect5 database be sure to use the fungi classification and not the plant option.

Fig. 1 Destroying Angel (Amanita bisporigera)
Fig. 2 Gross anatomy of mushroom fruit
Fig. 3 Mushroom gill structure where you can see the spores dusting the sides of the gills.
Fig.4 Mushroom cap divided to show internal anatomy of gill structure.
Fig. 5 Spore on mushroom gill. 100x magnification.

Note in

Fig. 6 Ball of soil, tree roots and fungal mycelium. 4X magnification
Fig. 7 Deep network of entangling mycelium. Magnified 40X
Fig. 8 Mycelium encompassing root tip of tree.This provides an opportunity to communicate with and exchange communication among neighboring plants.

Fungi form a vast, complex part of the floor of the forest, grassland, sloughs and savanas in almost all environments and on all of the continents. Unfortunately they are rarely seen or discussed. I hope that we have the opportunity to explore them in greater detail in the future,

References:

Mushroom species Look up

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We Are Going to Africa !

Specifically the four of us are going on a guided safari trip to Kenya and to Botswana. The goal of this trip is multifold. This will be our first visit to Sub-Saharan Africa. We hope to have fun enjoying the experience of the sights and sounds of two very special places at a particular time in Africa. I will collect samples of images and sounds of the animals and plants which we will see on our trip. These will be our special mementos of a very personal experience in two unique eco-systems. I will share with you these images and collected thoughts and relate them to our SWFL environment.

In preparation for our African photo safari some special measures are made. The multiple camp sites are in the wilderness and have no internet connection. We will be on safari for about 18 days. There are no retail outlets for spare parts or camera repair. Therefore, some redundant equipment will be carried. The cost of this excess lies in its weight. We are allowed a total of 33 pounds/person to be carried in soft-sided bags.

Here is most of the camera gear to be taken on safari.

Canon camera bodies (Only one showed here). 2 Canon lenses, filter and lens hood, flash attachment, power adapters, CF memory cards, one terabyte hard drive, camera and flash batteries, binoculars, iPad, IPhone, lens cleaners and camera dust bag, cables and flashlight, one Sealife point and shoot camera (not shown here) battery chargers, belts and straps and card adapters.

The total weight of this ensemble with back pack and miscellaneous is about 25 pounds. The remaining eight pounds will be for two weeks of clothing, meds, bug repellant, water flask, masks etc. Plastic bags are not allowed. Not inventoried here are protective cases for the camera gear, bubble wrap and styro-pellet camera support bag.

Some desirable equipment will not be available. This includes mono or tripod, additional lenses, audio gear, spotting scope.

All of this will go into an Osprey Stratus 24 back pack. It will go as carry-on for the transoceanic and local flights. In the field the cameras and lenses will be hand carried and a camera vest with pockets will support the in-field small stuff like note pad and pen, batteries, filter, CF cards etc.

I expect that there will be little need for fixed long lenses. The Canon lenses are 28-300 and 100-400. I expect the guides will take us into the bush and trails with close proximity to the wildlife.

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#Africa #camera #gear #safari #preparation

Tree Blooming Near the End of Summer

With this season we are nearing the completion of the annual cycle of the flowering trees before departing to Africa and Europe. We started this series in the first week of December of 2021 with Trees of Christmas. It has been a remarkable adventure to learn about and collect images and data for the flowering trees in South West Florida (SWFL). Nearly every hue and chroma of the rainbow has been represented in the flowers ranging from deep indigo to brilliant intense reds. See more details about them on our Epicollect5 website. The trees all have exotic origins from Europe, Africa, India and Central/South America. Perhaps we will find some similar trees in Botswana’s Okavango delta and the plaines of Kenya. If all goes as planned we will be there in August of this year.

The featured image is a Purple Glory.

Many of the Blooming Trees of Late Spring are still in flower and in part include the Royal Poinciana, Jacaranda, Plumeria, and the Mexican Tulip. Missing is the Bauhania which had been blooming since Christmas. It has, at last, given up the last flowers.

Royal Flamboyant Poinciana. Still one of my favorite flowering trees, it is repeatedly throwing out new blossoms and filling the neighborhood with a spectacular display of color.

Here are the last of the newly blooming trees which I found on my last walk about.

Pride of India (Langerstroemia Speciiosa). Native to South Eastern Asia including India.
Australian umbrella (Scheffera actinophylla). An evergreen tree native to Queensland Australia. Toxic to dogs and cats when eaten or touched by the sap.
Not as big as a standard tree the Princess flower tree is also known as Purple glory. It has some of the most intense purple flowers.
Purple glory (Pleroma semidacandrum) is native to Brazil.

All of these blossoms are found less frequently as the summer progresses. The neighborhoods and wilderness are definitely less colorful. The remaining flowers will probably last for two months. We will look again after returning from the safari. The interesting plants now include palms and pines. Next year adventures will focus on the palm trees more closely showing the varieties of colors, leaf patterns and fruiting bodies. We will finish the series by making the autumnal blossoms posting during the end of October.

After returning from Africa I hope to post a number of articles comparing the landscape, water features, plants and animals to those in SWFL. I expect these to be very interesting and hope that you are also interested.

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#summer #trees #cycle #blossoms

Mandarin Ducks and Chinese Costumes

The Mottled Ducks which we described earlier in our pond departed for the north, however, there are captive ducks which are noteworthy. My favorite is the Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata). They are originally from Asia and are very colorful. Perhaps they were named after the elite Chinese former imperial civil service. The name Mandarin may actually be derived from Portuguese.

I saw these in Central Park on Manhattan 45 years ago when I was working at the Sloan Kettering Institute. I was so surprised by their rich color. Due to the female’s lack of vibrant color I did not recognize them. The Mandarin ducks shown here are at the Wonder Gardens in Bonita Springs, FL. They are fun to watch and I was allowed to enter the restricted area with staff help to make these photographs.

The female is on the left and male is on the right. The couple is almost always together.
Backlight male shows the raised collar and sail.
Front lighting on the male. Those turned up amber tail feathers are so easy to spot.
Chinese quick-mask dancer wearing a traditional l旗裝 (Qizhuang) costume. Did they get the idea from the ducks?
Male showing off the high collar of spiked golden feathers.
Female in full color. Obviously, it has a less dramatic coloration and almost looks like the native Floridian Mottled Ducks whose the beak is yellow.

There is an extensive complex history of traditional formal clothing in China. They were not only fashionable, but also highly regulated by the Manchu who conquered the Han, but were eventually assimilated by them. The Qizhuang design was originally developed to facilitate horse riding and archery. It evolved over the 4000-year history of Manchu influence on the Han and Qing dynasties. It is a highly stylized formal clothing form worn in multiple variations by both men and women. They can be remarkably ornate and colorful.

This is an example of a Qizhuang or Cheongsam worn by women during the Qing dynasty. These are remarkably beautiful costumes yet true to the traditional style. Note the left to right closure of the upper half of the garment to facilitate archery, the pants to facilitate horse riding, the loose sleeves to provide unrestricted use of spears and swords and high collar to protect from the weather in long hunting or combat expeditions. She looks wonderful and so unlike the female Mandarin duck. Both the male quick-mask dancer and the costumed woman shown in this post were among the performers that I saw in Nanjing at the State opera. Apparently the costumes were not derived from the ducks but, like the dancers, they are all fun to watch.

References:

Why Mandarin Doesn’t Come From Chinese

Mandarin Duck

Eight Colorful Facts About the Mandarin Ducks

Traditional Chinese Clothing

Costume in the Qing Dynasty

Changing of Chinese Traditional Clothing

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#Cheongsam #Mandarin #duck #clothing #China #clothing # bird #feathers

Plumeria

I really paid attention to the Plumeria when we visited Hawaii 25 years ago. The flowers are used to make leis as a garland worn around the neck especially during a greeting ceremony. There are alternate names for the plants. A common name is “frangipani”. The scientific name is Plumeria Apocyanacea. The following adage apples to my experience in finding them in Florida. “If you don’t look for them you don’t see them”. While biking I noticed a tree that was remarkable for its lack of leaves and flowers. Now my eyes are open and I see them everywhere. Plumeria plants are native to Mexico and Central America.

In the fall the tree starts out with a very unbecoming aspect. It seems to be from another planet. I wondered why anyone would have such a strange looking tree dominating their front yard. Check out previous references to these trees in this blog Blooming Trees of Spring and Trees of Christmas.

This Plumeria tree in late fall is leafless and has no blossoms. It looks very strange and gives no hint to its potential colorful future. This is almost like the story of the ugly duckling.

In mid summer the Plumeria are in full color and the trees are spectacular. The trees that I found here are better than the trees which is saw in Hawaii. They thrive in the heat and full sunlight therefore many of the transient winter visitors may never see the blossoms.

Yellow Plumeria
White Plumeria with just a blush of color
White Plumeria with hints of pink and yellow. You can see the petals unfold in a spiral fashion from a tight bundle.
This variegated plumeria is dominated by the pink color with hints of white and yellow.
This deep pink Plumeria is my favorite. These are the blossoms from the tree which is shown in the first image of this post. The chroma is so intense and the velvet texture increases that appearance. There is no apparent pistol/stamen complex however I may have missed that stage in their development. I have not seen an orange blossom tree however while walking around the tree in bloom I did not miss the very fragrant odor.

As you would expect with a name of Apocyanacea, the sap of the plant is toxic.

#Plumeria #frangipiani

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To Tree or Not to Tree

Is a palm tree not a tree? In categorizing plants and animals for the Everglades Ark Epicollect5 data base I was conflicted in assigning the characteristics of trees to palms. I have called them palm trees forever but they really look different from oak, olive or other trees. Checking out the definition of a tree resulted in an ambiguous answer.

Featured image: In a spin about palms

Definition of tree: From a technical standpoint, palms fit American Forests’ current definition of trees, as they are woody plants with an erect perennial stem or trunk, at least 9.5 inches in circumference at 4.5 feet above the ground. They also have a definitively formed crown of foliage and a height of at least 13 feet. 

This still didn’t satisfy my curiosity. I still wondered why they were so different. Here are photographs of tree aspects to show the physical differences:

Tree landscape view

Olive tree, rigid and arborized branches
standing adjacent to palm
Palm tipped by heavy wind storm

Leaf patterns

Central vein with alternating branched secondary veins
Radial symmetry of straight palm leaves with straight unbranching veins

Photomacrograph leaves

Here is a demonstration of reticular veining ~35X
All straight, parallel veining without branching ~35X

Photomicrograph of leaves

Branching veins becoming progressively smaller as they branch ~600X
Straight, parallel veins even at the microscopic level at ~800X

Common biology of both di and mono cotyledonous plants. Both have chloroplasts for metabolism and stoma

Stoma are more randomly disbursed in the leaf surface. The stoma are on the underside of the leaf in the dicot group ~800X
Xylem and phloem circulation and stoma for respiration. The stoma are on the upper side of the leaf ~800X

Tree roots

Broad and deep root system of dicotyledon, olive tree adjacent to monocotyledon palm.
Root ball of monocotyledon, palm exposed by erosion

Tree cross sections

Tree rings show annual growth and suggest weather conditions. Specialized bark system.
No rings and no mechanism to repair. Bark is a remnant of leaf system.

Tree behavior to injury

Progressive but not yet complete healing of dicot tree

There is no mechanism for healing in palm trees.

Flowers

All dicots have five petals to their flowers

No petals but other monocots have three petals

Here is a list tabulating differences in the characteristics between the tree types.

Aspects:Palm True tree
Rootsshallow multiple small distributeddeep, branching with tap root
Trunkthe trunk is actually the stem which bendsthick, rigid
Branchesno branchesmultiple arborizations
Leavesveins begin at the base, run parallel to the length of the leaf, stoma on upper leaf surface central veins with multiple arborizations to leaf periphery, stoma on lower side of leaf
Outer surfacestumps of old growth leaves, no structured interior wood specialized bark covering wood
Trunk corefibrous without annular ringswoody, highly structured interior nutrient flow system
Interior structurefibrous with layered leavesorganized circulatory system, annular growth rings
Recoverycannot repair injury or diseasecan heal wound and fight disease
Developmentmonocotyledondicotyledon
DNAGrassTree
Comparison of plant distinguishing characteristics

A palm tree is really a palm grass.1 They are monocotyledons. Genetically they are similar to other grasses like bamboo. They are resistant to storm damage fracture because of their lack of a woody interior structure but are more subject to uprooting because of their shallow roots.

Grasses are flowering plants that are members of the monocot class that also include corn, rice, lilies, orchids and palms. Now that I understand what a palm is I can more freely post palm types, flowers and fruits. Later I will show the microscopic view of tree anatomy pointing out differences between monocots and dicots.

This subject opens a wide spectrum of ideas regarding plants. We have already broached the idea of cotyledons. There is much more to explore including the microscopic examination of cross sections of plants and their appendages or stems, roots and flowers as well as angiosperms vs gymnosperms and the role of sexual vs asexual reproduction and seed development.

The micrographs shown here are all done with simple direct bright field and transmitted light. Just wait until we get into cross sectional, stained, transmitted plane, and polarized light illumination!

The Epicollect5 database will be modified to reflect this altered view of classification.

  1. References:

Dicot vs monocot

Palm leaf anatomy

Plant vascular system

Plant leaf anatomy

#tree #palm #monocot #dicot #monocotyledon #dicotyledon #veins #stoma #annular rings #reticular veining #petals

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Duck Duck

These Mottled Ducks (Anas fulvigula) are commonly found in my back yard. They are spring residents in most of the local ponds of the community. They are fun to watch especially when the chicks follow the hen. Sometimes these birds are difficult to photograph because they are always on the look out for the Red Hawk which resides near by. The featured photograph is a mated Mottled Duck couple with female on left male on right.

What does this guy want with my spot? Juvenile little blue Herron in water with spotted white feathers changing in color to blue
Those pesky neighbors need to be chased away. Mottled duck drake and hen.
Sharing the shore with a hungry ibis.
Hen taking shelter in the high grasses
Are they gone yet? The bill of the female has a black with yellow tip
My hero! It’s OK honey. They’r gone.
The new clutch on a late afternoon trip
The chicks getting bigger.
“Watch out got the hawk, turtle, eagle, snake, alligator” … “OK mom”
The Red tailed Hawk that rules the pond.

These mottled ducks are very similar to the Mallard ducks in Michigan with which I am familiar. They are easily distinguished by the yellow bill.

Mottled Ducks form pair which bonds earlier than most other duck species. They typically pair in November well before the breeding season which starts the following spring. Male Mottled Ducks tend to remain with their mate well into the incubation period and sometimes later.

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#ibis #little blue heron #red tailed hawk #mottled duck #duck hens #drake #duck chicks #Anas fulvigu

Orchid Season Ends With a Price to Pay

The solution for low production is: light control, frequent water, fertilizer and pest control.

I worked diligently to encourage the orchids to grow this year because of the very poor performance of the last three years. Until last November all 12 of the vandas died. We explored the use of soap applied to control pests. The cattleya stopped all activity and what was left were leafless vertical branches. The phalaenopsis bloomed but minimally. In the face of this discouraging result I developed a new strategy. I gathered all of the plants in a protected but bright area in the courtyard with no direct sunlight and no rain. I replumbed the area to allow a garden hose attachment. I installed a timed, directed mist water spray system and I began an aggressive fertilization program. I used a soap spray to reduce the probability of pest growth. The results were prolific beyond my expectations! All of the plants grew doubling the size of the plants with new stems and leaves. In the home courtyard there are 20 phalaenopsis and 13 cattleya orchids. Most of the season has favored the phalaenopsis species where the plants have simultaneously provided at least 145 blossoms with a maximum production of over 220 during the three months. The cattleya have been growing but less prolifically with episodic blooming from some plants yielding about 30 blooms. They may still produce for the next two months. The cover picture is a cattleya with its second yield this season.

The phaleanopsis in the lanai orchid garden. You can see the irrigation lines leading to the plants.

The plants were watered with an automated misting system timed to 5 minutes on alternate days. They have been generously fertilized on alternate weeks. The first blooms came in early February and have persisted until now where I expect all to be lost in the next two to three weeks. The peak blooming period was one week before Easter (approximately March 14).

The Price of Production:

Now that the wet season has begun the watering is reduced and just in time. One plant has its first outbreak of mealy bugs (Coccoidea). These showed up on the crotons on the other side of the yard about two weeks earlier. I removed the crotons from the yard and sprayed them with an insecticidal soap. None the less here we are with an infection showing up on two of the phalaenopsis plants.

I first cut away one leaf that was highest infected and explored the specimen using the microscope. After identifying bugs accurately as mealy bugs. I treated all surfaces of the plants and the surface soil with a thorough spray of 70% alcohol.1 Orchids have succulent leaves and tolerated this treatment. After the alcohol evaporated I followed up with a spray of insecticidal soap.

Use as a direct aerosol spray from bottle.
Put into water solution and apply with sprinkler can
Mealybug eggs
Cotton like nest protecting the bugs
Ants are attracted to the sugary exudate from the bugs. The flying ants help to transport the eggs to a new location.

Plan for next season:

I think this has been a fair trade. Pest control is necessary to counteract the high fertilizer and water schedule. The ants are attracted by the mealybugs’ sugar, therefore, lowering the bug population will lower the attraction of the ants and reduce the spread of bugs. For the summer I have reset the watering timer lowering the watering rate. This is for two reasons. The plants have recovered from their earlier experiences and are now lush. The rainy season will begin soon with humid days. I also reduced the fertilizer concentration but I keep the same schedule. The plants need to rest. This will reduce the growth of the bugs. I will continue the alcohol and soap on scheduled basis to kill any remaining bugs before and during their next hatch. For next season I will Introduce new plants into the colony including dendrobium and cattleya orchids.

References:

  1. Home remedies for orchid plants

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#orchid #mealy bug #isopropyl alcohol #ants #mealybug #nest #fertilizer

Blooming Trees of Late Spring

There are a few stragglers from the early spring flowering trees. See the previous post on Spring tree blossoms. We now have a new collection of flowering trees that have captured my attention because of their spectacular blooms. These trees are not seen by the seasonally migrating residents nor by the tourists because they have returned home to their residences in the northern States. These are the next group of trees preparing for the new summer season.

I have included five flowering trees present along the streets of the city of Naples. It is difficult to express the overwhelming verdant, colorful canopies stretched over the avenues. A later post will specialize on plumeria varieties.

The cover image is a sample of a Southern Magnolia showing the leaf, bud, blossom and seed pod.

Flamboyant Royal Poinciana Tree (delonix regia). This huge tree is approximately 45 feet in height and width. The leaves are small almost like a locus tree. I found three variant colors of this species; red. orange and yellow.
Flamboyant Royal Poinciana tree blossom detail. This is the most vividly colored tree that I’ve ever seen.
The classic five petal flower of the Poinciana similar to the Bauhania and the Trees of Christmas
Here is a yellow variant of the Poinciana. It is native to Australia and Malaysia. This specimen is about 40 feet tall.
These yellow blossoms are so densely packed it is difficult to isolate only one as an example.
Cassia tree (Senna polyphylla) along the road side as I was bicycling along.
Desert Cassia tree blossoms before the tree leafs develop.
Pink Shower tree (Cassia javanica). This is one of a group of these trees at an entrance to one of the local subdivisions. Really spectacular but still delicate, it is breathtaking. Yes you can side trip on bicycle from the Ark.
Pink Shower blossoms. Pretty in pink with a touch of white and highlights of yellow stamen.
The blossom of the Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora)
Large blossom and evergreen shiny leaves are distinctive characteristics of this one of five Magnolia varieties.
Magnolia seed pod. It has such strange morephology.
Here is a small version of one of many very large magnolia trees.

There is a constant change in tree blooms throughout the year here in SWFL. The beauty and adventure of discovery adds delight in the journey. This is the third in a continuing series of blooming trees. All of these are located on the Everglades Ark Epicollect5 data base.

Thanks for your interest. I hope that you enjoy the trip through my eyes. Look for the Plumeria show in a post that is still to come. “Like” if you like it. Comment as you wish.

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# magnolia #poinciana #cassia #late spring #blossom #desert cassia #pink shower

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